Veterinarians committing suicide is becoming a growing problem

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MIDLAND, Tx. (KOSA) - According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention veterinarians are taking their own lives at alarming numbers.

Short said it’s important for the community to have open discussions about the things that are bothering them. She adds one day she hopes those numbers will decline.

Veterinarian Technician, Kendra Short has been in the field for the past 15 years. She said a veterinarian’s job is more difficult than people think.

Short believes having the talks about euthanasia, being in tough situations on a daily basis and not receiving enough recognition are reasons why veterinarians are at such high risk for suicide.

“It is personally devastating. There has been 3 vets that I have known that I have worked with in the past that fall into these numbers and it is sad,” said Short.

The CDC said veterinarians are 2-3 times more likely to commit suicide than the general population.

The study showed male veterinarians are 2.1 times likely and female veterinarians are 3.5 times more likely to die by suicide.

“I do not want them to have any more stress than what they need. Their jobs are already hard and tough. We see 30 to 60 patients a day here and that is something they do not need to stress about,” said Short.

Short said it’s important for the community to have open discussions about the things that are bothering them.

She adds one day she hopes those numbers will decline.

“I feel like veterinarians have the worst job and the best job at the same time because some of the things that are said to them are very disrespectful and hurtful,” said Short.

If you or someone you know is at risk for suicide call the National Suicide Prevention line at the number below.

1-800-273-8255.