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Museum says displaying Confederate statue part of healing

John Guess Jr., CEO Emeritus of the Houston Museum of African American Culture, talks about the bronze statue "The Spirit of The Confederacy" on display at the museum, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020, in Houston. The bronze statue, called "Spirit of The Confederacy," was removed from a downtown Houston park in June following a March 2018 recommendation by a task force established by Mayor Sylvester Turner. The statue, which has been in storage following its removal, arrived at the Houston Museum of African American Culture on Monday. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
John Guess Jr., CEO Emeritus of the Houston Museum of African American Culture, talks about the bronze statue "The Spirit of The Confederacy" on display at the museum, Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020, in Houston. The bronze statue, called "Spirit of The Confederacy," was removed from a downtown Houston park in June following a March 2018 recommendation by a task force established by Mayor Sylvester Turner. The statue, which has been in storage following its removal, arrived at the Houston Museum of African American Culture on Monday. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)(David J. Phillip | AP)
Published: Aug. 18, 2020 at 2:23 PM CDT
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HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston museum dedicated to conserving African American culture says its decision to display a more than 100-year-old Confederate statue is about providing Black Americans with a way to confront slavery’s painful legacy and include their lived experiences in the conversation.

The towering bronze statue, called “Spirit of The Confederacy,” was removed from a downtown Houston park in June.

The statue arrived at the Houston Museum of African American Culture on Monday.

John Guess, Jr., the museum’s CEO Emeritus, says displaying the statue will allow African Americans to confront and engage with the painful history of slavery.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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