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Orphaned El Paso toddler grows up in shadow of massacre, coronavirus

In this May 23, 2020  photo provided by Tito Anchondo, Paul Anchondo is held by his grandmother, Brenda Anchondo in El Paso, Texas. The toddler is unlikely to learn until years from now what happened to his parents in events that many El Paso residents still struggle to comprehend, said uncle Tito Anchondo, whose brother Andre and sister-in-law Jordan died in the shooting at a Walmart store last year. (Herman Delgado via The AP)
In this May 23, 2020 photo provided by Tito Anchondo, Paul Anchondo is held by his grandmother, Brenda Anchondo in El Paso, Texas. The toddler is unlikely to learn until years from now what happened to his parents in events that many El Paso residents still struggle to comprehend, said uncle Tito Anchondo, whose brother Andre and sister-in-law Jordan died in the shooting at a Walmart store last year. (Herman Delgado via The AP)(Herman Delgado | AP)
Published: Aug. 3, 2020 at 9:55 AM CDT
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EL PASO, Texas (AP) - An infant boy who survived a shooting last year that left his parents and 21 others dead now likes to thumb through picture books and dance to a Batman jingle with his grandmother.

His uncle says the toddler, Paul Anchondo, probably won’t learn for years what happened to his parents in an event that many El Paso residents still struggle to comprehend.

Tito Anchondo says the attack at a Walmart a year ago opened his eyes to violent racial tensions in the U.S. that he had not noticed in El Paso.

Authorities say the gunman was targeting Latinos.

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